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contact@unitedmindsproject.com

Registered in England and Wales NO.11700798

Facts to Show You're Not Alone

Mental health has become one of the leading causes of death in recent years. It is believed 1 in 6 adults experience anxiety or depression (which is the most common illnesses). A staggering 1 in 5 adults at some point in their lives believed that their only way to recover from a mental health problem is by taking their own life.

Those who are prone to greater exposure and vulnerability to poor social, economic and environmental circumstances are known to be at higher risk of suffering from mental health problems. This also includes other factors such as gender, ethnicity and disability.

A recent index of 301 diseases found mental health problems to be one of the main causes of the overall disease burden worldwide.1 (They were shown to account for 21.2% of years lived with disability worldwide.)

In 2013, depression was the second leading cause of years lived with disability worldwide. In 26 countries, depression was the primary driver of disability.2

One in six (17%) of people over the age of 16 had a common mental health problem in the week prior to being interviewed. This is an increase from the 2007 survey, which found that 16.2% had a common mental health problem in the past week.3

Nearly half (43.4%) of adults think that they have had a diagnosable mental health condition at some point in their life (35.2% of men and 51.2% of women). A fifth of men (19.5%) and a third of women (33.7%) have had diagnoses confirmed by professionals.4

 

In 2014, 19.7% of people in the UK aged 16 and older showed symptoms of anxiety or depression – a 1.5% increase from 2013. This percentage was higher among females (22.5%) than males (16.8%).5

 

The gap in rates of common mental health problems between young men and women (aged 16–24) has been growing. In 1993, young women were twice as likely (19.2%) to have symptoms of a common mental health problem compared to young men (8.4%). In 2014, these symptoms were nearly three times more common in young women (26.0%) than in men (9.1%). Anxiety was found to be more common in young women than in other age groups.6

 

In 2013, there were 8.2 million cases of anxiety disorder.7

 

in England, 6.8% of all women were diagnosed with general anxiety disorder compared to 4.9% of all men.8

 

Self-harm is not necessarily linked with suicide, but can increase the risk of suicide.

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), in 2014, a total of 6,122 suicides were recorded in the UK for people aged 10 and older (10.8 deaths per 100,000 population). This equates to approximately one death every two hours – a 2% decrease from 2013. Of these, 75.6% were male and 24.4% were female.9

 

The National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness (2015) found that, from 2003–13; there were 18,220 suicides by people who had had mental health service contact over the past year in the UK.10

 

In 2014, suicide was the leading cause of death for men under 50 years of age in England and Wales, and for women aged 20–34.11

 

Recent statistics show that 72% of people who died by suicide between 2002 and 2012 had not been in contact with their GP or a health professional about these feelings in the year before their suicide.12

 

The same study found that young people aged 16–24 were more likely to report suicidal thoughts than any other age group, with women in this age group having the highest levels of suicidal thoughts than any other group.13

Nearly half (43.4%) of adults think that they have had a diagnosable mental health condition at some point in their life (35.2% of men and 51.2% of women). A fifth of men (19.5%) and a third of women (33.7%) have had diagnoses confirmed by professionals.4

 

In 2014, 19.7% of people in the UK aged 16 and older showed symptoms of anxiety or depression – a 1.5% increase from 2013. This percentage was higher among females (22.5%) than males (16.8%).5

 

The gap in rates of common mental health problems between young men and women (aged 16–24) has been growing. In 1993, young women were twice as likely (19.2%) to have symptoms of a common mental health problem compared to young men (8.4%). In 2014, these symptoms were nearly three times more common in young women (26.0%) than in men (9.1%). Anxiety was found to be more common in young women than in other age groups.6

 

In 2013, there were 8.2 million cases of anxiety disorder.7

 

in England, 6.8% of all women were diagnosed with general anxiety disorder compared to 4.9% of all men.8

 

Self-harm is not necessarily linked with suicide, but can increase the risk of suicide.

 

A 2014 UK survey found that one in six people tried to take their own life while on a waiting list for psychological therapy.14

 

Self-harm is a broad category, it covers any deliberate self-injury, and can occur with or without suicidal intent. Self-harm is especially common among younger people, and is linked to anxiety and depression.

 

The rates of self-harm have increased by 4% over the last 14 years.15

Within the Economic and Social Research Council’s (ESRC’s) 2016 European evidence briefing, it was highlighted that adults and those in midlife are often ignored and overlooked within mental health policy and research work.16

 

Throughout our adult life, the majority of us will be in work and will experience a range of changing mental health states, from poor to good mental health across our working life 64% of people with common mental health problems are employed; therefore, in the UK, there is an estimated 4.6 million people in work who may have a common mental health problem. That equates to 1 in 6.8 employed people experiencing mental health problems in the workplace.17

 

A 2008 review commissioned for the Health, Work and Wellbeing Programme highlighted that symptoms associated with mental health problems (e.g. sleep problems, fatigue, irritability and worry) affect one sixth of the working-age population of Great Britain at any one time and can impair a person’s ability to function at work.18

 

Evidence suggests that 12.7% of all sickness absence days in the UK can be attributed to mental health conditions.19

 

Workers with sickness absence due to mental ill health are seven times more likely to have further absence than those with physical health related sick leave.20

 

A 2014 study revealed that one in five of those who disclosed that they had a mental health problem to their employers felt that they had been sacked or forced out of their jobs as a result.21

 

In a 2010–11 UK survey measuring national well-being across people aged 16 and older, the average percentage of all respondents feeling anxious or depressed was 19%.22

 

The Royal College of General Practitioners reports that fewer than one in six older people with depression discuss their symptoms with their GP. Furthermore, only half receive suitable treatment.23

The case for the potential impact of prevention is strong, given that even with optimal care; studies suggest that less than 30% of the burden of mental health problems can be avoided by treatment.24

 

Mindfulness for different members of the school community (pupils and teachers) is an emerging development within the field of prevention. An evaluation of the Mindfulness in Schools Project has found that mindfulness interventions can improve the mental, emotional, social and physical health and well-being of young people who take part. It was shown to reduce stress, anxiety, reactivity and bad behaviour, improve sleep and self-esteem, and bring about greater calmness and relaxation.25, 26

 

Better mental health support in the workplace can save UK businesses up to £8 billion a year.27

 

Promoting well-being at work through personalised information and advice, a risk-assessment questionnaire, seminars, workshops and web-based materials will cost approximately £80 per employee per year. For a company with 500 employees, where all employees undergo the intervention, it is estimated that an initial investment of £40,000 will result in a net return of £347,722 in savings, mainly due to reduced presenteeism (lost productivity that occurs due to an employee working while ill) and absenteeism (missing work due to ill health).28

 

Introducing a workplace intervention in the form of an employee screening and care management for those living with (or at risk of) depression was estimated to cost £30.90 per employee for assessment, and a further £240.00 for the use of CBT to manage the problem, in 2009. According to an economic model, in a company of 500 employees where two thirds are offered and accept the treatment, an investment of £20,676 will result in a net profit of approximately £83,278 over a two year period.29

 

In 2014, 1.7% of people reported asking for treatment but not receiving it; this included 10.3% of those with severe symptoms of a common mental health problem. Analysis found that 16–34 year olds and those from lower-income households were more likely not to receive treatment, even if they asked for it.30

Young people aged 16–24 were found to be less likely to receive mental health treatment than any other age group.31

Many people with mental health problems will be seen mainly by their GP and will have only limited access to specialist mental health services.32

22% of people in England surveyed in the Community Mental Health Survey in 2015 said that they felt they did not have enough contact with mental health services to meet their needs.33

Peer support can be described as the support that people with lived experience of a mental health problem or learning disability give to one another. Support may be social, emotional or practical in nature. A key feature of peer support is that the support is mutually offered and reciprocal.34

There are few studies in the UK that have evaluated the effectiveness of these groups for people with mental health problems. The majority of groups that have been studied usually have small numbers of participants and use qualitative methods.

Given the relationship between mental and physical health, urgent action is needed to overcome barriers to treatment and prevention. Much can be done to avoid the impact of mental health problems and to promote well-being; therefore, raising awareness of mental health costs and potential savings through prevention and early intervention is vital.

The 2013 Chief Medical Officer’s report estimated that the wider costs of mental health problems to the UK economy are £70–100 billion per year – 4.5% of gross domestic product (GDP).550 However, estimating this figure is very complex and an earlier study carried out by Centre for Mental Health found that, taking into account reduced quality of life, the annual costs in England alone were £105.2 billion.35

 

In 2015, employees in the UK took 138.7 million working days off because they were ill or in pain, according to the ONS’s Labour Force Survey. That is approximately 4.4 days per person employed.36

 

Recent statistics show that the number of days absent from work due to sickness, per person employed in the UK in 2015, is 4.4 days; this is 60% of the number of days taken per person employed in 1993 (7.2 days).37

 

In 2015, common mental health problems (e.g. anxiety, depression and stress) and more serious mental health problems were the third most important cause of sick leave. In 2015, mental-health-related issues were found to lead to approximately 17.6 million days’ sick leave, or 12.7% of the total sick days taken in the UK.38

 

These figures, however, are based on 2007 39Based on 2007 data, a report published by The King’s Fund estimates that mental-health-related social and informal care costs in England amount to £22.5 billion a year. These costs are projected to increase to £32.6 billion by 2030, which is mainly due to a £9 billion increase in treatment and care for people with dementia.costs, and are likely to be an underestimate.

 

The average annual cost of lost employment (per employee) in England is estimated at £7,230 due to depression and £6,850 due to anxiety in 2005–06.40

 

Mental ill health and its associated output losses in Wales in 2007–08 were estimated to be £2,681 million per year, of which £1,161.50 million is due to sickness and other in-work costs, £1,409.60 million is due to unemployment, and £110 million is due to premature mortality.41 Unfortunately, specific data for Northern Ireland and Scotland is unavailable.

 

In 2011, the amount spent on cancer research was £521 million, resulting in approximately £1,571 per cancer patient, while the average spent on mental health was £115, equating approximately to £9.75 per adult with a mental health problem.

 

According to a 2013 survey published by the Department of Health, the total investment in adult mental health services for 2011–12 was £6.629 billion, while this was a 1.2% in cash increase compared to 2010–11, it was a real-terms decrease (taking inflation into account) of 1%582 from £2.859 billion in 2010–11 to £2.830 billion in 2011–12.42

 

According to the same report, priority was given to three areas (i.e. crisis resolution, early intervention and assertive outreach) and, overall, investment fell by £29.3 million. Only early intervention reported an increase.584 However, investment in psychological therapies, in real terms, increased by 6% in 2010– 11.43

 

The financial gap in mental health expenditure is one of the biggest concerns of health professionals and researchers. The number of individuals with mental ill health is expected to rise significantly in the near future.44